When Worlds Collide 2

Details
Details

Leighton House

Details
Details
Details
Details

"Agent Provocateur is a British Lingerie retailer founded in 1994 by Joseph Corre and Serena Rees. The company sought to sell colourful and fashionable lingerie though began manufacturing a line of lingerie under the company's name after failing to source via other brands. Following the takeover, the company expanded into 13 countries with over 60 stores. By March 2008, Agent Provocateur's profits dropped 18pc to £2.2 million due to the cost of expansion."

Many models work for AP- "in previous years, these have included Kylie Minouge (2001) and Kate Moss in 2006 and 2008. Hollywood actress Maggie Gyllenhaa took over for supermodel Kate Moss as the new face for the line in 2007.

Details
Details

Leighton House

The Leighton House Museum is a museum in the Holland Park district of Kensington and Chelsea in London. The former home of the painter Frederic, Lord Leighton, it has been open to the public since 1929.

Built for Leighton by the architect and designer George Aitchison, it is a Grade II* listed building. It is noted for its elaborate Orientalist and aesthetic interiors.[1] It is open to the public daily except Tuesdays, and is a companion museum to 18 Stafford Terrace, another Victorian artist's home in Kensington.The first part of the house (2 Holland Park Road, later renumbered as 12) was designed in 1864 by the architect George Aitchison, although Leighton was not granted a lease on the land until April 1866.[2] Building commenced shortly afterwards, and the house, which cost £4500 equivalent to £386,054 in 2015, was ready for occupation by the end of the year.[3] The building is of red Suffolk bricks with Caen Stone dressings in a restrained classical style.

The architect extended the building over 30 years; the first phase was only three windows wide. The main room was the first floor studio, facing north, originally 45 by 25 feet, with a large central window to provide plenty of light for painting. There was also a gallery at the east end, and a separate staircase for use by models.[4] The house was extended to the east in 1869–70.

 

Details

shoes in the 1800's

As late as 1850 most shoes were made on absolutely straight lasts, there being no difference between the right and the left shoe. Breaking in a new pair of shoes was not easy. There were but two widths to a size; a basic last was used to produce what was known as a "slim" shoe. When it was necessary to make a "fat" or "stout" shoe the shoemaker placed over the cone of the last a pad of leather to create the additional foot room needed.

Up to 1850 all shoes were made with practically the same hand tools that were used in Egypt as early as the 14th century B.C. as a part of a sandal maker's equipment. To the curved awl, the chisel-like knife and the scraper, the shoemakers of the thirty-three intervening centuries had added only a few simple tools such as the pincers, the lapstone, the hammer and a variety of rubbing sticks used for finishing edges and heels.Efforts had been made to develop machinery for shoe production. They had all failed and it remained for the shoemakers of the United States to create the first successful machinery for making shoes.In 1845 the first machine to find a permanent place in the shoe industry came into use. It was the Rolling Machine, which replaced the lapstone and hammer previously used by hand shoemakers for pounding sole leather, a method of increasing wear by compacting the fibres. This was followed in 1846 by Elias Howe's invention of the sewing machine. The success of this major invention seems to have set up a chain reaction of research and development that has gone on ever since. Today there are no major operations left in shoemaking that are not done better by machinery than formerly by hand.

Details
Details
Details
Details
Details
Details

Comments


    Add comment

    Fields marked by '*' are required.
    Comments are moderated. If you choose to make this comment public, it will not be visible to others until it is approved by the owner.